BIG SATs SIT-IN

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You have achieved the expected standard for KS2 SATs.

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English children are amongst the most tested in the world. If you want to see an end to high-stakes SATs tests, write to your MP now.

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What is The Big SATs Sit-in? Join us in London on 5th December. Try your hand at a longer SATs paper and show your support for the More Than A Score campaign.

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Organise your own SATs Sit-in. In a village hall, or even your own kitchen, there are lots of ways to join the Big SATs Sit-in.

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Try our times tables test

Parents and teachers already know how well children can do their times tables. So why has the government introduced a very intense Multiplication Tables Check that no one needs?

It’s the latest in an assembly line of tests designed to use our children as data points and measure schools against each other. And it's not helpful to children or teachers.

Try our test to see what eight- and nine-year-olds face in the summer term. Remember, you only have SIX seconds to answer each question. Will you achieve 100%...?

Start the test

General

To begin the test, click on the timer to start your two minute countdown.

Good luck!

Times tables test

You must not use a calculator to answer any questions in this test.

Type your answer in the box for each question.

Marks

In this test each question is worth 1 mark each. The total number of marks available is 25. You have 6 seconds for each question.

To begin the test, click on the timer to start your first 6 second countdown.

Maths paper

You must not use a calculator to answer any questions in this test.

Type your answer in the box for each question. If the answer is a fraction, it can be typed using the / key
e.g. 1/2 = ½

Marks

Each question is worth 1 mark, with the two parts of question 8 worth 1/2 a mark each. The total number of marks available is 10.

To begin the test, click on the timer to start your 10-minute countdown.

English paper

You will be awarded 1 mark for each correct question. The total number of marks available is 10.

To begin the test, click on the timer to start your 10-minute countdown.

We don't need standardised times tables tests

Knowing your times tables is a key foundation to understanding maths. It introduces children to an exciting world of numbers, patterns and problem-solving techniques.

Obviously, a quick recall of tables helps when it comes to more complicated maths. But teachers know how well each child can do their tables, which ones they’ve mastered, and which ones they’re working on. Because they already teach and measure progress using informal tests.

So why has the government introduced a standardised Multiplication Tables Check for year 4 pupils? It’s another unnecessary way to use children to measure schools.

Children must answer 25 questions with 6 seconds to answer each one. If they don’t answer within the time limit, they are marked “incorrect”. Schools are ranked in league tables based on how many pupils achieve 100%.

This test doesn’t provide any information that teachers don’t already know. Preparing pupils for a test that focuses on just one aspect of maths ahead of the others is a waste of valuable teaching time. While, for pupils, the pressure of getting the questions right in a high stakes test can actively discourage children from developing problem-solving techniques

 


9th March 2022

A times tables test too far

When the government announced its intention to develop a test to encourage schools in England to focus on ensuring children learn their times tables, few people complained because it is clearly the case that children benefit from knowing these results. Support for such a test was based on the assumption that any test introduced would be carefully developed to ensure it was fit for purpose. 


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22nd January 2020

Too many tests for no good reason: parents stand against primary school testing

Our latest research demonstrates that the majority of parents disagree with the government’s policy of using SATs and other formal […]


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